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Locations : Laurel Springs, Haddonfield, Mt Laurel, Somers Point, and Washington Township, NJ

All Posts in Category: Ironman Triathlon Preferred Partner

The New York Times – Bring On the Exercise, Hold the Painkillers

Over the weekend a fantastic article that speaks to a team of chiropractors like we have at the office appeared on my social feeds! On The New York Times Running Newsletter the following article was published about exercise and why some forms of NSAID’s and Painkillers and endurance athletes like runners, swimmers, and cyclists should think first before just dismissing the issue and reaching for ibuprofen or naproxen in most cases.

Taken directly from the article by Gretchen Reynolds:

Taking ibuprofen and related over-the-counter painkillers could have unintended and worrisome consequences for people who vigorously exercise. These popular medicines, known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, work by suppressing inflammation. But according to two new studies, in the process they potentially may also overtax the kidneys during prolonged exercise and reduce muscles’ ability to recover afterward.

Direct Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/05/well/move/bring-on-the-exercise-hold-the-painkillers.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ru_20170707&nl=running&nl_art=1&nlid=80378830&ref=headline&te=1&_r=0

NSAID use is especially widespread among athletes in strenuous endurance sports like marathon and ultramarathon running. By some estimates, as many as 75 percent of long-distance runners take ibuprofen or other NSAIDs before, during or after training and races.

Being a marathoner myself I cannot refute the fact that on occasion I do take the label dosage of ibuprofen but understand that in most cases this is a poor choice for dealing with a running issue.  While most outsiders think of our office as “just another chiropractic office” we also offer Active Release Technique, commonly referred to as “ART” and in sports like running, cycling, and swimming, we usually offer a huge amount of upside with treatment to all sorts of issues commonly encountered.  I have even broken myself to some extent to not use ibuprofen (advil) or naproxen (aleve), which at times is tough with very small injuries that often times only slow me down, but do not keep me from running and going to the gym.

Some other valuable links about “pills” and runners / endurance athletes to check out are the following!

The Pill Problem – The right drug can relieve pain and discomfort—or put you in a world of hurt.

Direct Link: http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-treatment/what-runners-should-know-about-pain-medications

From the article written by Christie Ashwanden:

After winning a 24-hour track run in record time, Stephanie Ehret should have been celebrating. Instead, she was in a Phoenix emergency room, vomiting up a strange substance, which a doctor informed her was part of her digestive-tract lining. Feverish and nauseous, Ehret could barely move. “I’d never felt so bad,” she says. “I was pretty sure I was dying.”

A few hours later, doctors diagnosed the problem—rhabdomyolysis, a potentially fatal precursor to kidney failure. Though dehydration and overexertion contributed to Ehret’s condition, doctors told her that the 12 ibuprofen pills she’d taken during the 24-hour race had pushed her kidneys into the danger zone.

When used properly, over-the-counter pain medications can be a godsend. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can tame many pains. And non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen can reduce pain and swelling in the first few days following an acute injury like an ankle sprain. The trouble comes, doctors say, when people, like Ehret, misuse these drugs. “A couple of ibuprofens really helped, so I figured more was better,” Ehret says. Indeed, many runners treat anti-inflammatory drugs like “vitamin I,” says pharmacologist Joe Graedon, coauthor of The People’s Pharmacy book series. “They think, I’m putting my body through a lot, so I’ll just dose up on ibuprofen, without appreciating how potentially dangerous this drug can be.”

The Dangers Of Mixing Meds While Running

Direct Link:  https://houseofrunning.com/the-dangers-of-mixing-meds-and-running/

From the article written by Laurie Villarreal for House of Running –

I was at the start of the CPC half marathon last weekend when a runner said to me that she had just taken some ibuprofen for a headache. I immediately thought, “oh no, bad idea.” While ibuprofen might help with a headache or with post-race inflammation, it can be too risky to take before a running event. This is something that I never do. Before mixing medication with running, it’s quite important for you to know the risks as well.

Ibuprofen is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), which can be particularly risky for runners. NSAIDs also include the common drugs aspirin and naproxen, as well as many others. When taken before or during a run, it can cause harm to your kidneys, increase your blood pressure to risky levels, and put you at greater risk for hyponatremia. No matter the reason for taking an NSAID, it is not often worth the risk.

The best part about being a chiropractor who specializes in Active Release Technique here in South Jersey is that more than likely we can correct most running issues using hands on Myofascial Manipulation coupled with treatments like Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Manipulation and some NATURAL anti-inflammatories to keep you running, biking, swimming, cross fitting, ninjaing and more at a very high level!

Questions?  Give our front desk a call at 856-228-3100 or use the contact us link below!

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The New York Times – How To Avoid Heatstroke

Wanted to share a nice little article that showed up on my social feed this morning about avoiding heat stroke this summer.  We as adults often times think it does not happen to us as “recreational runners” but I have witnessed everything from hypothermia to heatstroke at running races!  Check out the article at the following link and remember that it is not just high school kids at summer practices who take it a bit too far.

NYT Link — https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/29/how-to-avoid-heatstroke/

One thing we are fairly certain of is that it does always involve hydration levels either and even ambient temperature around you can be anywhere from the 70’s, 80’s, or 90’s in terms of Farenhiet when heatstroke can set in, even on overcast days versus sunny days. It simply has to do with core temperature levels of the athlete.

The following info is taken directly from the article:

Scientists don’t yet know why some people become seriously ill while exercising in hot weather, and others don’t. At one time, it was believed that exercise-related heat illness was caused by the sizzling rays of the sun beating onto an athlete’s skin, causing overheating from the outside in, and contributing to dehydration, which was thought to be a primary cause of heat problems. But that theory doesn’t explain why athletes develop heat illness on overcast days, when sunlight isn’t directly reaching them. They’ve also been known to become ill on relatively cool days, when temperatures are below 80 degrees. And many collapse despite being fully hydrated.

“There’s still a lot we don’t understand” about heat illness, says Douglas Casa, an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Connecticut, who’s extensively studied athletic performance in the heat.

Heat illness itself is an omnibus term, covering “a spectrum of seven or eight different conditions,” that range from mild heat exhaustion to life-threatening heat stroke, Casa says. August is prime season for the illnesses, since, even as temperatures soar, many athletes must or choose to continue exercising outside. “Football teams start two-a-day practices at this time of year,” Casa says. Runners training for a fall marathon increase their mileage. So do cyclists and triathletes preparing for autumn events.

Scientists have a pretty clear picture of what happens inside these athletes as they exert themselves. They bake. Muscles in motion generate enormous amounts of energy, only about 25 percent of which is used in contractions. The other 75 percent or so becomes body heat.

NYT Link — https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/29/how-to-avoid-heatstroke/

We highly encourage you to check out this fantastic article and if you are suffering from common running issues, athletic performance issues, or any time of injury, give us a call at 856.228.3100 or send us an email at the link below!

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Dr Craig’s favorite prehabilitation exercise – Monster Walk with Theraband

I teach this exact exercise several times a day as well as a few variations almost on the daily since the basis of most of our patients are runners.  This exercise can never be done slowly enough, anyone can do this movement quickly but slow down and act like you have a hot cup of coffee in your hands.  Almost everyone does these exercises quickly and while there is nothing wrong with that, slower is almost always better.  Check out all the following videos on how to practice this excellent prehab movement for most runners struggling with “typical runner stuff”.

If you are a South Jersey runner struggling with pain and tenderness as we lead up to the big part of summer running season which is just ahead (Broad Street Run, Philly Rock N Roll Half, Chicago Marathon, Philly Half and Philly Marathon are all on the horizon) give us a call at 856.228.3100.

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Excellent explanation of why your GPS is off a bit during a race – USATF – Runners World – Competitor Mag

Recently while watching the Run856 chatter on Facebook we saw a great deal of back and forth about just about everyone being slightly off when looking at their watch time and distance versus their race chip time and the known and verified race distance.  One of the Run856 users shared this explanation from the USATF:

http://www.usatf.org/Products-/-Services/Course-Certifications/USATF-Certified-Courses/Certify-Your-Course/Statement-on-GPS-Use-by-Runners.aspx

Taken directly from the USATF below:  

USATF/RRTC Position on GPS used by runners

Effective June 6, 2014

GPS devices work by receiving signals from satellites. The quality of different GPS units can vary, but all of them can be affected by conditions such as buildings in urban environments or heavy overhead tree cover that interfere with reception of the satellite signals and can cause them to be inaccurate.

Race courses Certified by USATF are measured by a proven method that incorporates the calibration of measuring devices against a steel tape and are verified by multiple measurements.

Race courses are measured along a well-defined path called the “SPR”—the Shortest Possible Route that a runner can possibly run. Most runners don’t actually run the SPR, so the distance recorded by their GPS device will usually be longer than the certified length of the course, even though the course was properly measured along the SPR according to USATF rules.

http://www.usatf.org/Products-/-Services/Course-Certifications/USATF-Certified-Courses/Certify-Your-Course/Statement-on-GPS-Use-by-Runners.aspx

More articles that go a bit more in depth on the topic:

Competitor Running:  Is Your GPS Watch Lying To You On Race Day?

http://running.competitor.com/2014/06/training/debating-the-accuracy-of-gps-vs-race-distances_105664#RoEILe2Q6OuR7Bdm.99

Runners World Magazine:  chip time vs. gun time vs. GPS time

http://community.runnersworld.com/topic/chip-time-vs-gun-time-vs-gps-time

 

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Calling all Philadelphia and South Jersey manual therapists! We are hosting SMART Tools with The Training Room!

Dr. Mark Kemenosh and Associates with the help of our good friends at The Training Room Physical Therapy group of South Jersey are proud to announce we are hosting the SMART Tools Level 1 IASTM certification at our shared facility in Washington Township aka Sewell, NJ.  We are putting the word out to everyone in manual medicine who would like to come out to feel welcome!  We plan to have DPT’s (Doctors of Physical Therapy), DC’s (Doctors of Chiropractic),  ATC’s (Athletic Trainers), and possibly more attending this event!  The course is a full two days and will be held on July 29th and 30th, a little down the road in the middle of summer!

SMART TOOLS – LEVEL 1 CERTIFICATION – SEWELL, NJ

Date: Sat July 29 – Sun July 30, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm (each day)

Venue: The Training Room of Washington Township (Inside Velocity Sports Performance)

309 Fries Mill Rd
Sewell, NJ 08080

This course lays the foundation for how to properly use the SMART Tools most effectively with respect to movement. The tools were made specifically for these technique protocols to produce superior patient outcomes compared to other IASTM technique. This is an evidence-based technique that stresses early loading exercises and kinesiology tape after SMART Tools treatment.

The goal of therapy is to provide an optimal environment for the healing, by either modifying physiologic responses to injury (e.g., inflammation, muscle spasms, pain) or enhancing components of the normal musculoskeletal function (e.g., increase range of motion, increased muscular strength). No single therapeutic approach in isolation will completely resolve an impairment of musculoskeletal function. Smart Tool Plus® represents an approach to soft tissue manipulation that uses five different stainless steel instruments to release scar tissue, adhesions, and fascial restrictions. SMART Tools are designed to be used in conjunction with a thorough medical evaluation, movement based examination and other modalities to help patients overcome injuries.

Therapeutic stretches and exercises (preferably eccentric exercises) are necessary to promote tissue lengthening and collagen fiber realignment, which help to prevent the released tissue from becoming restricted again.

The primary objective of the Level 1 Certification course is to develop an understanding of the STP and how to apply it into the full spectrum of the musculoskeletal treatment approaches. By the end of the training, students will be able to:

Demonstrate a working knowledge of the STP Instruments, STP treatments and potential effects and benefits.
Identify and discuss the indications, contraindications (relative and absolute) of IASTM.
Review and develop a better understanding of soft tissue injury, healing and potential reactivity to instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (therapeutic and adverse).
Develop skill and competence in the STP application of the IASTM to the major regions of the spine and extremities.

Treatment effects of IASTM

  • Breakup abnormal densities in tissue
  • Stimulate nervous system
  • Reinitiate first-stage healing in the body via proliferation
  • SMART Tools IASTM techniques aim to treat the following Tissue Extensibility Dysfunctions

(TEDS):

  • Scarring & Fibrosis
  • Facial Tension & Densification
  • Neural Tension
  • Muscle Shortening
  • Neurologic Restriction
  • Trigger Points

This isn’t Gua Sha, nor is this another general IASTM course. This is a movement-based IASTM course unlike anything currently offered. Our training course addresses the neurological component, as well as the physiological component of the IASTM and corrective exercises in ways other courses do not.

This course is designed for clinicians that either have never used tools or have been using tools for years. Each will come away with new, innovative material.

So if you want faster patient outcomes, quicker recovery time, improved clinician ergonomics to save your hands, and last but not least, no patient bruising, then register for a course today and add a powerful technique to your toolbox… no pun intended.

Need more info?  Ready to register?

LINK:  http://www.smarttoolsplus.com/product/level-1-sewell-nj

 

 

Need more info?  Ready to register?

LINK:  http://www.smarttoolsplus.com/product/level-1-sewell-nj

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Haddonfield Adrenaline 5k – Quickly approaching SELL OUT!

Date:  Saturday, March 18th, 2017

Adult’s Race Type:  5k Run

Children’s Race Type:  Kids 1/4 Mile Run and 100 Meter Run

Description: The 12th Annual Haddonfield Adrenaline 5K Run will be held Saturday, March 18, 2017. The 5k starts at 9am in front of Haddonfield High School and is followed by a kids 1/4 mile and 100 meter races on the Haddonfield High School track.

The 5K race is USATF certified, and serves as the MidAtlantic 5K Championship. This event is sponsored by the RunningCo. of Haddonfield.

Kick off the 2017 running season with an adrenaline pumping race!!!

Link:  https://runsignup.com/Race/NJ/Haddonfield/HaddonfieldAdrenaline5K

Team Challenges:

Note: No Race Day Team Registration.

Corporate Team Registration allows an organization to pay for their employees and families. Click on Corporate Team and Create New Team.

Competitive teams will still be the same:

3 to a team to score, no maximum. Awards to top 2 teams in each of the following categories:

– High School Club Team (Male and Female)

– Family Team

– Corporate Team

Packet Pickup:

March 15-17 from 10AM – 7PM at Haddonfield Running Company, 121 Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033.

Race Day Packet Pickup at Haddonfield High School starting at 7AM.

****** ONLINE REGISTRATION CLOSES MIDNIGHT SUNDAY, MARCH 12 *****

The race almost always sells out before Sunday, March 12th however so do not wait.  

Directions: From the Ben Franklin Bridge, take Rt. 30 East. Follow signs for “Cherry Hill”. After ramp, take Route 70 East about 3 miles to Route 41 exit to Haddonfield, continue straight. After the second traffic light, Park Ave., Haddonfield High School is on your right. Follow signs for parking.

From Rt. 295, take Exit 32 – Haddonfield/Gibbsboro. At the end of the exit ramp, turn onto Route 561 West (Haddonfield/Berlin Road) towards Haddonfield. Travel straight on Route 561 for about 3 or 4 miles, make a right onto Kings Highway, Haddonfield High School is on your left. Follow signs for parking.

Cash Prizes:  

Top 5 Overall Male and Female Runners:

1st – $400
2nd – $250
3rd – $150
4th – $100
5th – $50

Top 3 Overall Masters Male and Female

1st – $100
2nd – $75
3rd – $50

Awards:
Finishers medals for all runners. Wait til you see the 12 year design!!!

Awards to Top 3 Male and Females in the following Age Groups: Under 14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70+.

Check out the video for more info!

 

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Outside Opinion – Shoes on the finishers at the Kona IronMan 2014

Competitor Magazine has become my new running magazine.  Dr. Kemenosh recently laid a copy on my desk to read and it has been fantastic!  The magazine was good, but the online content has been even better.  With Dr. Mark and I constantly giving each other the raspberries about running shoes and endurance training, I could not miss a link that appeared on Competitor magazines website.

LINK:  http://running.competitor.com/2014/10/news/sole-man-shoes-ironman_115927

Article:  Sole Man: The Shoes Of Ironman

Author:  Brian Metzler

Notes about the author:  Brian Metzler is the editor-in-chief of Competitor magazine. He has raced every distance from 50 yards to 100 miles and run in more than 700 pairs of running shoes in the past 25 years.

Authors Bio:  http://running.competitor.com/author/bmetzler

The article above, which I encourage you to take a look at if you like running shoes as much as Dr. Kemenosh and I, do shows that the top running shoes finishing at the Kona IronMan races last weekend were as follows, ASICS, Saucony, Newton, and Brooks.  No big surprise there, those all seem like very logical choices, however, when you go a little farther down the list, Dr. Kemenosh’s new love affair with the Hoka One One is being validated again as 6 percent of IronMan runners wore Hoka’s.  That is a huge climb from 2013 (1.9 percent) and 2012 (1.2 percent).  If you want me to quantify that a bit for you, more runners at the Kona IronMan wore Hoka’s than Mizuno, Zoot, Nike and New Balance!

The article goes onto explain that you can’t put too much stock into these findings as triathlon and long distance endurance athletes do tend to be a bit “gear crazy” as the author states.  Secondly, they were only to count shoes by the BRAND and it’s not a specific model count.  Ultimately, there is no serious science here, but it’s somewhat apparent that endurance and running athletes are making some choices with their feet out there.

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I think my “insert relative here” could benefit from Active Release, how do I find them in “insert state here”

We are starting to get this questions almost every day of the week now and while it does get repetitive answering the question, we still love doing it!  The scenario goes like this, we get questions or calls a few times a day asking how they can find a family member a reliable, “similar chiropractor to you guys” in another state or area of the country.  It could be grandma who relocated to Florida after retirement, or a cousin who lives in Seattle that you will never forgive for transferring his allegiance away from the Eagles to those birds who patrol the northwest coast lines (aka the Seahawks if you are still paying attention) and it really is easy to take a look for yourself!

  1. Go to the Active Release Technique Website at:  http://activerelease.com/
  2. Don’t just stop there, now go to:  http://activerelease.com/providerSearch.asp
  3. Put in a town, address, or zip code and the ART website database tries to find you someone.

It’s just that easy!  We are now over the 10,000 ART provider mark in North America and growing stronger everyday.  If you have any further questions, like anything else, give us a call!  856-228-3100

active-release-technique-south-jersey-kemenosh-evans-gross-legath

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South Jersey and Philly Races – Holiday Edition – Fall Edition

Looking for a fun race this fall?  A turkey trot for the family?  One last trip to the shore before we all settle in for the winter?  Here you go!  Big shout out to our friends at D&Q in Cherry Hill for emailing this list out!
Check out D&Q at https://www.dandq.com/
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Through spectacular Holiday Light Display
Nov. 18, 2016 (Friday Evening)  – 7:00 pm
Yardley, PA
(online registration closes 11/16)
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Complimentary glass of wine to participants over 21
Nov.  19, 2016 – 10:00 am
Renault Winery, Egg Harbor City, NJ
(online registration closes 11/17)
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North Wales, PA
(online registration closes 11/22)
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Nov. 24, 2016 – 8:30 am
Ocean City, NJ
(online registration closes 11/21)
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Nov. 26, 2016 – 8:00 am
Doylestown, PA
(online registration closes 11/24)
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Nov. 26, 2016 – 9:00 am
Westmont, NJ
(online registration closes 11/23)
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Exodus Sport & Fitness – Open House this past summer – OCNJ

Dr Mark set up shop at the Exodus Sport and Fitness open house this past Saturday in Ocean City, New Jersey.  We support and advocate for all our patients to remain active and as healthy as possible when it comes to being our patients, so an opportunity like this is where we are right at home.  In the following pictures, Dr. Mark demonstrates Active Release Technique of the shoulder on a trainer from Exodus.  Tight, achy, “torn up” shoulders are very common condition we see in our patient populations for various reasons.  Old baseball injuries, swinging the golf club, and rec league volleyball walk in our office each day and walk out feeling much better!

dr-mark-exodus-sports-and-fitness-open-house-ocnj dr-mark-exodus-sports-and-fitness-open-house-ocnj-pic-2 dr-mark-exodus-sports-and-fitness-open-house-ocnj-pic-3

Check us out on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/DrMarkKemenoshAndAssociates/

Check out Exodus on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/exodussport/

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