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Locations : Laurel Springs, Haddonfield, Mt Laurel, Somers Point, and Washington Township, NJ

All Posts in Category: Omega 3 Fish Oil

Krill Oil found to be overrated! Just use good fish oil for Omega 3 supplementation!

Another myth busted by Dr. David Seaman, the best practitioner at deflaming your diet is back to show you why Krill oil derived Omega 3’s just doesn’t make sense when put to the test.  We get a lot of patients telling us that they get Krill oil pushed on them from other avenues (Television, Radio Ad’s, Popup Stands at Costco and Walmart) and they all discuss that Omega 3’s from Krill oil are better and that is just not simply true.  Check out the video below narrated by Dr. Seaman showing you why good Omega 3’s Fish Oils like the products we carry from Anabolic Labs.

So what are the basics of Omega 3 fatty acids from both fish and plant sources.  Here we go hold on tight.

There are the two main types of omega-3 fatty acids:

Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids are EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These are plentiful in fish and shellfish. Algae often provides only DHA.

Short-chain omega-3 fatty acids are ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). These are found in plants, such as flaxseed. Though beneficial, ALA omega-3 fatty acids have less potent health benefits than EPA and DHA. You’d have to eat a lot to gain the same benefits as you do from fish.  This somewhat puts vegetarians at a bit of a disadvantage right from the start when dealing with inflammation levels.  

At this time we have very supportive but not conclusive research shows that consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

Hundreds of studies also suggest that omega-3s may provide SOME benefits to a wide range of diseases: asthma, depression, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and even possibly neurologically disorders like Alzheimers all may benefit from omega-3 consumption.

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Everyone is talking about Vitamin D, but does it really matter?

Just having the TV and radio on in the back ground lately and my ears seem to be picking up on more and more news reports about Vitamin D and how important it is.  These few nice days we have been getting here in sunny South Jersey have given us an early taste of spring and we should probably at least somewhat talk about Vitamin D and why we see so many deficiencies.  Dating back to 2008, Harvard Health was already on the topic of the importance of Vitamin D for more than just bone health.  We all know that we need Vitamin D to helps us absorb calcium, but lately we are seeing more and reasons to keep your Vitamin D levels topped off.

Link:  http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/time-for-more-vitamin-d

Starting at about September, the fall hits for most of the northern hemisphere which means less time in the sun.  From October until May, most of us who live in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware are more or less running on a deficit in our Vitamin D stores due to the position of Earth with respect to the sun (the winter season) as well as the fact that we go outside much less due to the temperature.  Some of us are also greatly affected by day light savings time as well when looking at working hours, versus time in the sun, versus active hours.

Looking at a map of the United States also shows that we have a bit of a problem when it comes to Vitamin D levels  Check out the map below:

Thanks to those scientists who figure the tough questions out for us, in the winter time MOST larger US cities are probably starved for the amount of sunlight it takes to keep your Vitamin D levels adequate!  Those who live in the Southern United States are lucky, meaning areas like Florida, Texas, Arizona and Southern California all get more sun than almost all the other areas of the United States.  You can clearly see what this means for those of us relative to New Jersey as shown in the map above.  When Vitamin D blood levels are compiled for the United States, we also feel that values taken from the southerners sometimes skew levels when compared to someone who lives in the north.  To put it simply, if you live in Miami, San Antonio, or Los Angeles, you probably get a good bit more sun than someone who lives in Philadelphia, Chicago, or Seattle!  This would stand to reason then that you probably need a bit more Vitamin D supplementation if you live above the 37th parallel, so again, see the image above!

So what else do we know about Vitamin D that really help us, take a look below:

Vitamin D protects against colds and flu, finds major global study

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170216110002.htm

Vitamin D helps to reduce respiratory infections

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161116103005.htm

High quality evidence suggests Vitamin D can reduce asthma attacks

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160906085652.htm

Vitamin D deficiency increases risk of chronic headache

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170104103543.htm

Increased levels of active vitamin D can help to optimize muscle strength

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170215145953.htm

So how do you get around 1,000 IU’s each day?  

Currently, the RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) of Vitamin D is 400 IU’s daily.  Most low end multivitamins contain around 400 IU’s of Vitamin D for this reason. People who are living in the north in the winter time might actually need a bit more than that.  While we can’t recommend mega dosing at this time due to limited evidence, a strong amount of evidence shows that you probably should get 800-1000 IU’s daily living in areas like New Jersey.  Being that you are not living in an area like Florida, Texas or Southern California, and if your diet is not that great, you may want to think about supplementation.  Your family doctor can be a huge help here as testing your levels with blood tests is fairly simple to see what your baseline levels are.

At the office, we carry several types of supplementation avenues with respect to Vitamin D.  All of the doctors at this office use the Anabolic Labs Essential Nutrition Pack which contains high quality vitamins, minerals, and omega 3’s.  Inside the box are 30 days worth of exactly what you need.  We also carry Vitamin D Micro Tabs (very small, easy to swallow) separately, and a product known as AVED (A Vitamin Every Day), which is a high quality daily vitamin.

Click on the images below to see a larger view of the products and supplement facts:

First up, the Anabolic Labs Essential Nutrition Pack (30 days, pretty much the best you can buy hands down):

 

Next up, Anabolic Laboratories AVED-Multi (AVED means a A Vitamin Every Day):

And last, but not least, the product that a lot of our orthopedic sports medicine and family doctors refer to us for, our super tiny (EASY TO SWALLOW) Clinical D3 microtabs!

Are you in need of even more information about Vitamin D?  Check out this paper from the Mayo Clinic!  

Vitamin D Deficiency in Adults: When to Test and How to Treat:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912737/

Abstract:
Recent evidence for the nonskeletal effects of vitamin D, coupled with recognition that vitamin D deficiency is common, has revived interest in this hormone. Vitamin D is produced by skin exposed to ultraviolet B radiation or obtained from dietary sources, including supplements. Persons commonly at risk for vitamin D deficiency include those with inadequate sun exposure, limited oral intake, or impaired intestinal absorption. Vitamin D adequacy is best determined by measurement of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration in the blood. Average daily vitamin D intake in the population at large and current dietary reference intake values are often inadequate to maintain optimal vitamin D levels. Clinicians may recommend supplementation but be unsure how to choose the optimal dose and type of vitamin D and how to use testing to monitor therapy. This review outlines strategies to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin D deficiency in adults.

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New guidelines outline how to handle back pain – American College of Physicians say the first line of therapy should be non-drug treatments

From the CBS News Review:  

New guidelines from the American College of Physicians say the first line of therapy should be non-drug treatments. For pain lasting less than three months, those include heat wraps, massage, acupuncture and spinal manipulation (hey, that is what we do here at the office, combined with Active Release Technique). The authors stress that clinicians should avoid costly and potentially harmful treatments like narcotics.

For pain lasting more than three months, treatments include stretching and strengthening exercises, tai chi, yoga, acupuncture, and mindfulness techniques like meditation to relieve stress.

If those fail, anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen should be considered first, then medications that can dull nerve pain, like tramadol or duloxetine.

“Some of these treatments such as yoga or massage are often offered outside the traditional healthcare system,” said Dr. Steven Atlas of Massachusetts General Hospital, who wrote an editorial about the guidelines.

“Some of these guidelines may be a shot across the bow to insurers to say that maybe we should be covering them better,” Atlas said.

From the Wall Street Journal Review:  

The new guidelines could influence how doctors treat patients with complaints of back pain. They are an update from 2007’s and include a review of more than 150 studies. Recommendations were broken down into acute and subacute lower back pain, which is pain lasting less than 12 weeks, and chronic pain, which is pain lasting more than 12 weeks. They don’t apply to radicular low back pain, sometimes referred to as sciatica, which is caused by compression of the nerves in the spine and can result in leg pain.

For acute and subacute pain, the guidelines recommend nondrug therapies first, such as applying heat, massage, acupuncture or spinal manipulation, which is often done by a chiropractor. If a patient requests drugs, the first line of treatment should be nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)—over-the-counter, such as Advil, or prescription, such as celecoxib (brand name Celebrex), or muscle relaxants, such as cyclobenzaprine (brand name Flexeril).

Links to Articles:  

Wall Street Journal:  https://www.wsj.com/articles/no-drugs-for-back-pain-new-guidelines-say-1487024168?mod=e2tw

CBS News:  http://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-guidelines-how-to-handle-back-pain/?ftag=CNM-00-10aab7e&linkId=34463543

Questions about what we can and can’t help out with?  Feel free to call us at 856-228-3100

OR

Email us on our Contact Us Page!  

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New research shows that Omega-3 supplementation can help prevent childhood asthma!

If you listen to our docs long enough you will note that a very common theme in our office is “take your Omega 3’s, they pretty much have some benefit for everyone”.  With the new information presented in the YouTube video embedded above, the University of Waterloo has again helped the public health world proving more of what we already suspected.  In this case, some fairly new research has shown that Omega 3 supplementation in expecting mothers greatly reduces the prevalence of childhood asthma down the road.  Here at the office our docs fairly reguarly, if not daily take Clincal Omega 3’s from Anabolic Labs due to a handful of reasons.

So why should most of us who CAN take Omega 3’s take a HIGH QUALITY Fish Oil supplement?

First off, one of the very few preventative suggestions for possibly avoiding or preventing the amyloid plaques present in Alzheimer’s is DHA supplementation (one of the two most important contents inside a HIGH QUALITY FISH Oil supplement)  Look at the statement below,

From the NIA Website:

“Some scientists have focused on DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), an omega-3 fatty acid found in salmon and certain other fish. Studies in mice specially bred to have features of Alzheimer’s disease found that DHA reduces beta-amyloid plaques, abnormal protein deposits in the brain that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s. Although a clinical trial of DHA showed no impact on people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, it is possible that DHA supplements could be effective if started before cognitive symptoms appear.”

Link:  https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/preventing-alzheimers-disease/search-alzheimers-prevention-strategies

Moving on, there is a growing body of evidence that when expecting mothers should supplement regularly with DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), an omega-3 fatty acid found in salmon and other cold water fish and measured accurately in all high quality supplements, good things happen for the babies in those pregnancies.

From a research paper published in the journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology stated the following:

“Recommendations:  There is little doubt that pregnant women need at least as many omega- 3 fatty acids as nonpregnant women, and likely need more DHA. The recommendations for dietary omega-3 fatty acids should be adopted at the onset of pregnancy, but there may be benefits for all women who are considering becoming pregnant. Given concerns for mercury toxicity with overconsumption of certain fish, in order to meet these recommendations, pregnant women will need to consume omega-3 fatty acids from 3 sources: vegetable oils, 2 servings of seafood per week, and omega-3 fatty acid supplements containing EPA and DHA or DHA alone. Intake of omega-6-rich oils found in sunflower, corn, and cottonseed oils should be minimized because they are converted to substrates that compete with EPA. Pregnant women should reduce their intake of these oils and substitute others that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids like flaxseed, canola, and soybean oil.”

Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2621042/

One of the best, concise, medically referenced uses of Omega 3 information is located at the University of Maryland Medical Center hosted at UMM.edu, some of the topics covered on this site are high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), osteporosis, depression, as well as others.

Link:  http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/omega3-fatty-acids

The following is taken from the UMM.edu supplementation of Omega 3’s website:

“Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and may help lower risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis. Omega-3 fatty acids are highly concentrated in the brain and appear to be important for cognitive (brain memory and performance) and behavioral function. In fact, infants who do not get enough omega-3 fatty acids from their mothers during pregnancy are at risk for developing vision and nerve problems. Symptoms of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency include fatigue, poor memory, dry skin, heart problems, mood swings or depression, and poor circulation.”

If you are looking for some help with an issue in the south Jersey regions, we would be glad to offer our opinion.  You can call our main office at 856.228.3100.

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CNN Article – Here’s why you exercise so much and still can’t lose weight

We see a lot of runners in our office, as in A LOT OF RUNNERS, and we very proud of that niche!  We are the ones that occasionally have to tell them to stop running for a bit (which is always great fun… … …).  This article resurfaces every so often and is very important read for runners.  The article touches on the fact that often times even if you ramp up your mileage in training, you won’t necessarily loose more weight due to running.

Please note all credit for this article is given to Carina Storrs, a CNN.com author.  The full link to her article is below.

Some key points from the article state:  

The study is in step with a growing body of research suggesting that burning a bunch of calories is a less realistic weight loss strategy than we might have thought, or hoped. “We can’t push the calories out [value] around too much,” Pontzer said. “Our bodies work very hard to keep it the same.”

It might be time to shift that standard public health message: To lose weight, simply exercise more. “We would say that ‘If you want to lose weight, you probably ought to focus on changing your diet and watching how much you eat.’ Exercise can help and it’s really important [for health in general], but they are two different tools,” Pontzer said.

The challenge of trying to lose weight just by exercising more is no secret to some clinicians. “This study actually explains a phenomenon that I see quite commonly,” said Dr. Holly F. Lofton, director of the Medical Weight Management Program at NYU Langone Medical Center.

“I see patients training for a marathon and they ask me, ‘Why am I not losing weight?’ ” even though they are exercising more and eating the same number of calories, Lofton said.

“If you run all the time, try biking or swimming, and if you bike, try running or swimming, because using different muscles can increase your energy expenditure again,” Lofton said. “It may also be possible to decrease and then increase your activity again and get an increase [in calorie burning],” she said.

And if you think you can necessarily rely on your Fitbit or other device to tell you how many calories you burned, think again: We probably burn proportionally fewer calories as we exercise above a certain level of intensity.

I highly feel that you should read the entire article on CNN.com at the following link:

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/28/health/weight-loss-exercise-plateau/?iid=ob_homepage_NewsAndBuzz_pool&iref=obnetwork

The overall point of this article is just this, if you are runner who is putting in a reasonable amount of miles weekly and still struggling with weight loss or injuries from too much running, you need to re-evaluate your plan from the top down.  Runners can almost always benefit from swimming, hiking, cycling, strength training, core stability and a HEALTHIER DIET.  There I said it, it had to be said and I said it.  As a runner myself, I once thought that running a good deal (usually around 25 miles per week or more depending on the training cycle) would allow me to eat and drink whatever I wanted.  Simply put, after many years of struggling with my diet, chiropractic somewhat put me on the track to greatly improving my diet as well as figuring out how to make meals healthier.  If you need help with running injuries, diet recommendations, and some cross training recommendations, give our office a call, 856-228-3100.

 

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What Anabolic Laboratories Supplements Does The Office Keep IN STOCK?

We get a lot of calls from patients all over Southern New Jersey looking for specific Anabolic Laboratories supplements in stock so we are compiling a list of what we normally keep around the office.  Currently the items we do our best to keep in stock are as follows.  Please note that we keep these products in stock at our Laurel Springs office (right off Chews Landing Road and the Black Horse Pike).  Most locals call our area of Laurel Springs by Gloucester Township actually.

AVED Multi Vitamin – Daily Multi Vitamin

Clinical Omega 3’s (Adult Omega 3’s)

Chewable Omega 3’s (Kids Omega 3’s)

Clincal D3 Microtabs (Vitamin D)

Clinical Magneisum

CoEnzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

Essential Nutrient Pack (Daily vitamin with EPA and DHA from fish oil, Vitamin D3 softgels, and Magnesium caps)

Multi-Enzyme (Digestive Enzymes)

NutraDisc (Promotes collagen production, supports rebuilding of cartilage and lowers inflammation)

PRO-ENZ (Recommended for follow up after the acute phase of injury is addressed, as support for patients with physically demanding lifestyles (heavy labor, athletes) as well as those subject to pro-inflammatory lifestyle factors (poor diet, stress, etc.))

Some of the other products we find to beneficial to our patients are the following topical creams and gels.

BioFreeze (Topical Pain Relieving Roll On Liquid)

Rock Sauce (Topical Pain Relieving Cream)

T-Relief (Topical Pain Relieving Gel)

We also keep foam rollers, lacrosse balls, and back supports for office chairs and car seats in stock at our “home-base” location in Gloucester Township, NJ.

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Medical News Today – Acid Reflux – Diet Diet Tips for GERD: Foods to Eat and Avoid

Great review article popped up on my Twitter feed a few days ago with some great diet recommendations for dealing with GERD.  GERD is commonly agreed upon to be problematic in about 20 percent of the North American population.  Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux, is a long term condition where stomach contents come back up into the esophagus resulting in either symptoms or complications.  Symptoms include the taste of acid in the back of the mouth, heartburn, bad breath, chest pain, vomiting, breathing problems, and wearing away of the teeth.

When the symptoms of GERD occur more than twice a week for a period of more than 3 weeks, it is considered to be a chronic disorder.

Check out the following tips over at Medical News Today:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314690.php?utm_campaign=trueAnthem:+Trending+Content&utm_content=5852b2c204d3012d5ffc4b1b&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter

When foods that trigger GERD are avoided, it greatly helps to improve our patients quality of life, usually by helping them sleep with less acid reflux / GERD symptoms.

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“Walking is not a very good back exercise” mentioned on PBS this weekend, not a very good opinion

I was slightly shocked listening to a show on PBS this weekend discussing all forms of exercises to help with aging.  On the the show they were discussing a wide variety of exercising from a large panel and the topics of discussions were yoga, pilates, stretching routines, swimming, cycling, running and many other forms.  A statement was made on the show however that “Walking is not a very good back exercise” and I almost dropped my pain brush in the garage, loaded with white paint!

Hold on and prepare yourself  on why this is a poor attitude to have towards “talking a walk”.  While I feel the person making this statement was comparing walking against pilates or aerobics and basing their statement on muscle activation and stretching, walking is actually a good exercise for the back.  When you look at walking from a stance of worrying about the deepest areas of the spine, and not just your “back muscles”, then you realize quickly that walking is very essential to spinal health and is actually a good exercise for the back.

Spinal mobility is intimately related to the health of the spinal discs.  If you take the flexibility out of the disc itself, spinal mobility and flexibility will be decreased greatly.  This means, the discs help to provide a great deal of rotating levels and bendable materials so that we can move.  If the discs in our spines were not flexible, we would feel like we had a stiff board for a back and not a system of joints that permits movement.  Disc hydration is what allows the discs to remain mobile.  Around ages 18 – 22, the spinal discs ability to self hydrate starts to steadily reduce.  This means that about the time you truly become a skeletal mature adult, lets say by age 25, the only way that the core of your discs can be lubricated, watered, and fed with nutrients is through a process known as imbibition.

Bare with me on this in relation to the original point that “Walking is not a very good back exercise”.  The opening and closing action of intradiscal spaces (space the disc resides in between two bones known as vertebral bodies), applies and then releases pressure on the disc causing a pumping process with feed and nourishes the disc with water and nutrients.  This pumping motion sucks fresh spinal fluid in and compress old spinal fluid out.  This process is very critical to the health of the discs, keeping them soft, compressible and flexible.  To take this point even further, when a person sits still, the process of imbibition is stopped completely.  So yes, sitting in an office chair for long periods of time does negatively impact your spine in most cases when looking at the spinal discs.

So my response to the idea that “Walking is not a very good back exercise” is that the statement is completely false and while walking does not strengthen your back musculature, it is imperative to discal health deep inside the spine.  Furthermore, when compared to a daily activity of sitting in a desk chair for long periods of time, walking for a sore back can be just what the doctor ordered.

Looking for more information about your spine or need some old low back looked at?  Give us a call and we will try and help you as much as possible.  856-228-3100 

dr-mark-kemenosh-release-pain-reach-potential-running-doctor

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Our favorite daily vitamin pack – Anabolic Laboratories – Essential Nutrition Pack

We get a lot of questions here at the office that somewhat sound like “what do you take doc?” and for the most part, this is about it for the docs that work at our office outside of something being wrong, but for the most part, we keep good diets, some average to excellent exercise habits, and don’t need much other than the product below.

Each Essential Nutrition Pack contains 30 individual packets which contain a disintegration-tested multi vitamin (1 tablet), concentrated EPA/DHA omega-3 fish oil (2 softgels), vitamin D3 – cholecalciferol (2 softgels) & magnesium from organic chelate sources (2 capsules).  The Essential Nutrition Pack is a 1-month supply of supplements which provide a solid nutritional foundation for those of us living that busy lifestyle and our meals aren’t exactly super healthy!

Research continually supports the need to bolster most diets with nutritional supplements to promote health and prevent disease. The supplement combination contained in the Anabolic Labs Essential Nutrition Pack helps support the key biochemical mechanisms of an improved diet and nutritional status; inflammation reduction, antioxidant protection and cellular energy production. The best part about these packs are that they are easy to take, and individually packaged.  Anabolic Labs dietary supplements are also of the highest quality.  You can’t compare anything sold at a grocery store or big box retailer to the quality in these packs at a very affordable price.

The most important part of the Anabolic Labs Nutrition Pack is that they have 4 essential supplements, which most multi-vitamins DO NOT, or do not contain nearly enough of.

Multivitamin and Minerals – The modern diet is known to be deficient in numerous micronutrients. Supplementation with a multivitamin/mineral can help address many of these deficiencies. Low micronutrient intake may accelerate the aging process and promote the diseases of aging and other chronic diseases. Use of a multivitamin is thought by many authorities to be a wise preventive strategy in addition to a healthy diet. Iron should be taken only by those who have an iron deficiency.1

Vitamin D3 – We derive virtually no vitamin D from the diet, as we are supposed to convert vitamin D from the sun. Most Americans are chronically deficient in vitamin D. Sunscreen with an SPF of 8 reduces vitamin D production by 95%. Deficiency in this essential vitamin promotes a chronic inflammatory state and has been associated with many negative issues related to bone, cardiovascular, mental and immune system health. Vitamin D deficiency is also strongly related to the expression of pain.2

EPA/DHA from Fish Oil – Supplementing with omega-3 fatty acids (EPA/DHA) addresses the deficiency of omega-3’s in the modern diet and helps balance our ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids. Adequate omega-3 intake helps to balance inflammatory activity and promote health. Adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids help to promote joint and bone health, mental/emotional health, heart health, proper blood sugar regulation, nervous system health, and skin and eye health.3

Magnesium – Magnesium is chronically deficient in the modern diet, which promotes a chronic inflammatory state. Magnesium plays a role in over 300 bodily enzymatic reactions, which is why magnesium deficiencies are associated with very diverse clinical manifestations, even sudden death. Magnesium is critical for cardiovascular health, cellular energy production (ATP), neurological health, glucose metabolism, calcium transport, nerve signal conduction, and the maintenance of joint and bone health.4,5

If you have any questions or feel that possibly your levels of inflammation could be reduced and your diet improved, please schedule an appointment with Dr. Mark Kemenosh, Dr. Andrew Gross, Dr. Craig Evans, or Dr. Time Legath today.

 

anabolic-labratories-essential-nutrition-pack-1 anabolic-labratories-essential-nutrition-pack-2 anabolic-labratories-essential-nutrition-pack-3 anabolic-labratories-essential-nutrition-pack-4 anabolic-labratories-essential-nutrition-pack-5

 

References:

 

  1. Ames BN. Low micronutrient intake may accelerate the degenerative diseases of aging through allocation of scarce micronutrients by triage. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 2006; 103(47):17589-94.
  1. Cannell JJ, Hollis BW. Use of vitamin D in clinical practice. Alt Med Rev. 2008;13(1): 6-20.
  2. Simopoulos AT. The importance of the omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases. Exp Biol Med. 2008; 233:674-88.
  1. Ford ES, Mokdad AH. Dietary magnesium intake in a national sample of US adults. J Nutr. 2003; 133(9):2879-82.
  2. Bar-Dayan Y, Shoenfield Y. Magnesium fortification of water. A possible step forward in preventive medicine?Ann Med Interne (Paris). 1997; 148(6):440-4.
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