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All Posts Tagged: health and wellness

Everyone is talking about Vitamin D, but does it really matter?

Just having the TV and radio on in the back ground lately and my ears seem to be picking up on more and more news reports about Vitamin D and how important it is.  These few nice days we have been getting here in sunny South Jersey have given us an early taste of spring and we should probably at least somewhat talk about Vitamin D and why we see so many deficiencies.  Dating back to 2008, Harvard Health was already on the topic of the importance of Vitamin D for more than just bone health.  We all know that we need Vitamin D to helps us absorb calcium, but lately we are seeing more and reasons to keep your Vitamin D levels topped off.

Link:  http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/time-for-more-vitamin-d

Starting at about September, the fall hits for most of the northern hemisphere which means less time in the sun.  From October until May, most of us who live in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware are more or less running on a deficit in our Vitamin D stores due to the position of Earth with respect to the sun (the winter season) as well as the fact that we go outside much less due to the temperature.  Some of us are also greatly affected by day light savings time as well when looking at working hours, versus time in the sun, versus active hours.

Looking at a map of the United States also shows that we have a bit of a problem when it comes to Vitamin D levels  Check out the map below:

Thanks to those scientists who figure the tough questions out for us, in the winter time MOST larger US cities are probably starved for the amount of sunlight it takes to keep your Vitamin D levels adequate!  Those who live in the Southern United States are lucky, meaning areas like Florida, Texas, Arizona and Southern California all get more sun than almost all the other areas of the United States.  You can clearly see what this means for those of us relative to New Jersey as shown in the map above.  When Vitamin D blood levels are compiled for the United States, we also feel that values taken from the southerners sometimes skew levels when compared to someone who lives in the north.  To put it simply, if you live in Miami, San Antonio, or Los Angeles, you probably get a good bit more sun than someone who lives in Philadelphia, Chicago, or Seattle!  This would stand to reason then that you probably need a bit more Vitamin D supplementation if you live above the 37th parallel, so again, see the image above!

So what else do we know about Vitamin D that really help us, take a look below:

Vitamin D protects against colds and flu, finds major global study

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170216110002.htm

Vitamin D helps to reduce respiratory infections

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161116103005.htm

High quality evidence suggests Vitamin D can reduce asthma attacks

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160906085652.htm

Vitamin D deficiency increases risk of chronic headache

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170104103543.htm

Increased levels of active vitamin D can help to optimize muscle strength

Science Daily Link:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170215145953.htm

So how do you get around 1,000 IU’s each day?  

Currently, the RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) of Vitamin D is 400 IU’s daily.  Most low end multivitamins contain around 400 IU’s of Vitamin D for this reason. People who are living in the north in the winter time might actually need a bit more than that.  While we can’t recommend mega dosing at this time due to limited evidence, a strong amount of evidence shows that you probably should get 800-1000 IU’s daily living in areas like New Jersey.  Being that you are not living in an area like Florida, Texas or Southern California, and if your diet is not that great, you may want to think about supplementation.  Your family doctor can be a huge help here as testing your levels with blood tests is fairly simple to see what your baseline levels are.

At the office, we carry several types of supplementation avenues with respect to Vitamin D.  All of the doctors at this office use the Anabolic Labs Essential Nutrition Pack which contains high quality vitamins, minerals, and omega 3’s.  Inside the box are 30 days worth of exactly what you need.  We also carry Vitamin D Micro Tabs (very small, easy to swallow) separately, and a product known as AVED (A Vitamin Every Day), which is a high quality daily vitamin.

Click on the images below to see a larger view of the products and supplement facts:

First up, the Anabolic Labs Essential Nutrition Pack (30 days, pretty much the best you can buy hands down):

 

Next up, Anabolic Laboratories AVED-Multi (AVED means a A Vitamin Every Day):

And last, but not least, the product that a lot of our orthopedic sports medicine and family doctors refer to us for, our super tiny (EASY TO SWALLOW) Clinical D3 microtabs!

Are you in need of even more information about Vitamin D?  Check out this paper from the Mayo Clinic!  

Vitamin D Deficiency in Adults: When to Test and How to Treat:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912737/

Abstract:
Recent evidence for the nonskeletal effects of vitamin D, coupled with recognition that vitamin D deficiency is common, has revived interest in this hormone. Vitamin D is produced by skin exposed to ultraviolet B radiation or obtained from dietary sources, including supplements. Persons commonly at risk for vitamin D deficiency include those with inadequate sun exposure, limited oral intake, or impaired intestinal absorption. Vitamin D adequacy is best determined by measurement of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration in the blood. Average daily vitamin D intake in the population at large and current dietary reference intake values are often inadequate to maintain optimal vitamin D levels. Clinicians may recommend supplementation but be unsure how to choose the optimal dose and type of vitamin D and how to use testing to monitor therapy. This review outlines strategies to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin D deficiency in adults.

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Prevention.com – 4 Things You’re Doing That Are Ruining Your Joints

Dr Tim Legath forwarded me this article the other day and stated he thought it would be important if we linked it up on our blog! Before you go reading some of what has been copy and pasted below, you need to realize that we share this information for everyone’s benefit and that we are not trying to knock running, yoga, or pilates, but hoping that you need to realize that a wide variety of exercise and cross training best benefit your joints.

Prevention Magazine:  http://www.prevention.com/fitness/4-mistakes-making-joints-weak

The following is taken from the article written by CASSIE SHORTSLEEVE

“It used to be that joint replacements were a problem for older people. But today orthopedic surgeons are seeing people in their 40s, 50s, or younger. In fact, surgeons at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City say the number of people younger than 60 going under the knife is up at least 15% in the last 2 years. Plus, data from the National Center for Health Statistics finds the number of hip replacements more than doubled in a 10-year span, skyrocketing by 205% in people ages 45 to 54.
Surgeons attribute the rise to people wanting to stay active while they age, says Calin Moucha, MD, chief of adult reconstruction and joint replacement surgery at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Today’s implants also last longer than they once did, sometimes up to 40 years, he says. This means joint replacements are now an option at a younger age, since physicians aren’t as worried about having to replace them.”

So what does this all mean to you?  Well, our runners might not like what comes next…

“You’re a runner and only a runner.

Moucha says that many patients seeking joint replacement are in good cardiovascular health, but not necessarily good physical health. If you’re running marathons or triathlons only, you might have imbalances when it comes to muscle strength and flexibility. And this, paired with repetitive trauma over time, could lead to arthritis, he notes, causing your joints to wear away. 

“It’s important to cross-train,” says Moucha. Giving certain muscle groups (like the ones you use on long, slow jogs) a break once or twice a week while activating new muscles (like the ones you might use sprinting) can fend off injury, he notes. (You should consider working these strength-training moves into your exercise program.)”

Well what about all that Yoga that I do?  That’s probably good for me right?…

“You push yourself beyond your limits in yoga.

Intense workouts like HIIT and mud runs aren’t the only way to injure your joints. While yoga and Pilates are great ways to boost flexibility and strength, anything extreme when it comes to range of motion—like reaching for that pose your body’s not quite ready for—can put you at risk for a joint injury, notes Moucha. “When you create range of motion extremes, you can create bony spurs (projections along a bone’s edges) that may predispose you to arthritis,” he says. Your best bet isn’t to skip yoga but rather to stick with the modifications that work for you, and give yourself time before trying anything you might not be ready for.”

Check the article out for yourself today!  The link is below.

Prevention.com Article:  http://www.prevention.com/fitness/4-mistakes-making-joints-weak/

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CNN Article – Here’s why you exercise so much and still can’t lose weight

We see a lot of runners in our office, as in A LOT OF RUNNERS, and we very proud of that niche!  We are the ones that occasionally have to tell them to stop running for a bit (which is always great fun… … …).  This article resurfaces every so often and is very important read for runners.  The article touches on the fact that often times even if you ramp up your mileage in training, you won’t necessarily loose more weight due to running.

Please note all credit for this article is given to Carina Storrs, a CNN.com author.  The full link to her article is below.

Some key points from the article state:  

The study is in step with a growing body of research suggesting that burning a bunch of calories is a less realistic weight loss strategy than we might have thought, or hoped. “We can’t push the calories out [value] around too much,” Pontzer said. “Our bodies work very hard to keep it the same.”

It might be time to shift that standard public health message: To lose weight, simply exercise more. “We would say that ‘If you want to lose weight, you probably ought to focus on changing your diet and watching how much you eat.’ Exercise can help and it’s really important [for health in general], but they are two different tools,” Pontzer said.

The challenge of trying to lose weight just by exercising more is no secret to some clinicians. “This study actually explains a phenomenon that I see quite commonly,” said Dr. Holly F. Lofton, director of the Medical Weight Management Program at NYU Langone Medical Center.

“I see patients training for a marathon and they ask me, ‘Why am I not losing weight?’ ” even though they are exercising more and eating the same number of calories, Lofton said.

“If you run all the time, try biking or swimming, and if you bike, try running or swimming, because using different muscles can increase your energy expenditure again,” Lofton said. “It may also be possible to decrease and then increase your activity again and get an increase [in calorie burning],” she said.

And if you think you can necessarily rely on your Fitbit or other device to tell you how many calories you burned, think again: We probably burn proportionally fewer calories as we exercise above a certain level of intensity.

I highly feel that you should read the entire article on CNN.com at the following link:

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/28/health/weight-loss-exercise-plateau/?iid=ob_homepage_NewsAndBuzz_pool&iref=obnetwork

The overall point of this article is just this, if you are runner who is putting in a reasonable amount of miles weekly and still struggling with weight loss or injuries from too much running, you need to re-evaluate your plan from the top down.  Runners can almost always benefit from swimming, hiking, cycling, strength training, core stability and a HEALTHIER DIET.  There I said it, it had to be said and I said it.  As a runner myself, I once thought that running a good deal (usually around 25 miles per week or more depending on the training cycle) would allow me to eat and drink whatever I wanted.  Simply put, after many years of struggling with my diet, chiropractic somewhat put me on the track to greatly improving my diet as well as figuring out how to make meals healthier.  If you need help with running injuries, diet recommendations, and some cross training recommendations, give our office a call, 856-228-3100.

 

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