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Locations : Laurel Springs, Haddonfield, Mt Laurel, Somers Point, and Washington Township, NJ

All Posts Tagged: “best chiro in south jersey”

The New York Times – Bring On the Exercise, Hold the Painkillers

Over the weekend a fantastic article that speaks to a team of chiropractors like we have at the office appeared on my social feeds! On The New York Times Running Newsletter the following article was published about exercise and why some forms of NSAID’s and Painkillers and endurance athletes like runners, swimmers, and cyclists should think first before just dismissing the issue and reaching for ibuprofen or naproxen in most cases.

Taken directly from the article by Gretchen Reynolds:

Taking ibuprofen and related over-the-counter painkillers could have unintended and worrisome consequences for people who vigorously exercise. These popular medicines, known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, work by suppressing inflammation. But according to two new studies, in the process they potentially may also overtax the kidneys during prolonged exercise and reduce muscles’ ability to recover afterward.

Direct Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/05/well/move/bring-on-the-exercise-hold-the-painkillers.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ru_20170707&nl=running&nl_art=1&nlid=80378830&ref=headline&te=1&_r=0

NSAID use is especially widespread among athletes in strenuous endurance sports like marathon and ultramarathon running. By some estimates, as many as 75 percent of long-distance runners take ibuprofen or other NSAIDs before, during or after training and races.

Being a marathoner myself I cannot refute the fact that on occasion I do take the label dosage of ibuprofen but understand that in most cases this is a poor choice for dealing with a running issue.  While most outsiders think of our office as “just another chiropractic office” we also offer Active Release Technique, commonly referred to as “ART” and in sports like running, cycling, and swimming, we usually offer a huge amount of upside with treatment to all sorts of issues commonly encountered.  I have even broken myself to some extent to not use ibuprofen (advil) or naproxen (aleve), which at times is tough with very small injuries that often times only slow me down, but do not keep me from running and going to the gym.

Some other valuable links about “pills” and runners / endurance athletes to check out are the following!

The Pill Problem – The right drug can relieve pain and discomfort—or put you in a world of hurt.

Direct Link: http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-treatment/what-runners-should-know-about-pain-medications

From the article written by Christie Ashwanden:

After winning a 24-hour track run in record time, Stephanie Ehret should have been celebrating. Instead, she was in a Phoenix emergency room, vomiting up a strange substance, which a doctor informed her was part of her digestive-tract lining. Feverish and nauseous, Ehret could barely move. “I’d never felt so bad,” she says. “I was pretty sure I was dying.”

A few hours later, doctors diagnosed the problem—rhabdomyolysis, a potentially fatal precursor to kidney failure. Though dehydration and overexertion contributed to Ehret’s condition, doctors told her that the 12 ibuprofen pills she’d taken during the 24-hour race had pushed her kidneys into the danger zone.

When used properly, over-the-counter pain medications can be a godsend. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can tame many pains. And non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen can reduce pain and swelling in the first few days following an acute injury like an ankle sprain. The trouble comes, doctors say, when people, like Ehret, misuse these drugs. “A couple of ibuprofens really helped, so I figured more was better,” Ehret says. Indeed, many runners treat anti-inflammatory drugs like “vitamin I,” says pharmacologist Joe Graedon, coauthor of The People’s Pharmacy book series. “They think, I’m putting my body through a lot, so I’ll just dose up on ibuprofen, without appreciating how potentially dangerous this drug can be.”

The Dangers Of Mixing Meds While Running

Direct Link:  https://houseofrunning.com/the-dangers-of-mixing-meds-and-running/

From the article written by Laurie Villarreal for House of Running –

I was at the start of the CPC half marathon last weekend when a runner said to me that she had just taken some ibuprofen for a headache. I immediately thought, “oh no, bad idea.” While ibuprofen might help with a headache or with post-race inflammation, it can be too risky to take before a running event. This is something that I never do. Before mixing medication with running, it’s quite important for you to know the risks as well.

Ibuprofen is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), which can be particularly risky for runners. NSAIDs also include the common drugs aspirin and naproxen, as well as many others. When taken before or during a run, it can cause harm to your kidneys, increase your blood pressure to risky levels, and put you at greater risk for hyponatremia. No matter the reason for taking an NSAID, it is not often worth the risk.

The best part about being a chiropractor who specializes in Active Release Technique here in South Jersey is that more than likely we can correct most running issues using hands on Myofascial Manipulation coupled with treatments like Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Manipulation and some NATURAL anti-inflammatories to keep you running, biking, swimming, cross fitting, ninjaing and more at a very high level!

Questions?  Give our front desk a call at 856-228-3100 or use the contact us link below!

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Dr Mark Kemenosh – ELDOA Method – Colorado seminar this past weekend

Dr Mark Kemenosh and his daughter Jill Kemenosh, our future Pilates guru at the office both traveled to Colorado this past weekend to become certified in the Level 1 ELDOA Method which Dr. Mark started to do earlier this year when he studied under Guy Voyer, a DO who started the manual technique commonly referred to as “Joint Pumping”.  Dr. Kemenosh was exposed to Dr. Voyer who spoke at the Titlelist Performance Institute Wolf Golf Classic in late 2016 on the topics of articular joint pumping and the ELDOA method which has started to take fire in the golf training world.

Some of the techniques in the ELDOA method are greatly centered around techniques to help with injury prevention, reduce joint inflammation and arthrosis, delay disc degeneration, increase disc hydration, and to even possibly normalize disc bulges.

Here is some information from the ELDOA Methods webiste:

The ELDOA exercises and Myofascial Stretches are specific techniques created by world renowned osteopath, Guy VOYER DO. ELDOA METHOD Classes are semi private group classes organized by certified ELDOA/MFS Instructor, Stephanie McCusker, who uses a combination of these techniques as well as other Somatraining techniques to deliver the most beneficial sessions possible. The ELDOA METHOD classes were founded in Los Angeles, CA and are now being offered here in Auckland, NZ. These Classes are not based on a formula. Every class is designed to respect the proper progressions and order of the techniques as taught by Dr. Voyer to ensure quality. These classes will vary depending on the needs of those participating. There will be an intentional goal set for each designated class and will be ever changing to continually challenge each individual while encouraging their overall improvements.

BENEFITS OF ELDOA METHOD Classes

ELDOAs and Myofascial Stretches are very specific and complex techniques that require strong attention to form and correct progressions. Everyone will benefit from the effects of ELDOAs and MFS but each person is different and without proper instruction and help from a Certified ELDOA/MFS Instructor, these techniques will not be as effective. By attending the classes, you not only receive instruction from a certified instructor but the full hour dedicated to stretching enhances the many benefits including:

  • Normalize Disc Bulges
  • Reduced Degrees of Scoliosis
  • Increased Flexibility
  • Improved Muscle Performance and Tone
  • Normalization of Visceral Function
  • Reduced Stress
  • Injury Recovery and Prevention
  • Reduced Joint Inflammation and Arthrosis
  • Delayed Disc Degeneration
  • Increased Disc Hydration
  • Increased Blood Flow
  • Improved Posture
  • Relief of Chronic and Acute Back Pain
  • Relief of Neck and Shoulder Tension
  • Improved Awareness and Overall Wellbeing
  • Improved Recovery Time for Sports and Training
  • Reduced Forward Head Posture

**DISCLAIMER**

The ELDOA METHOD classes and website are not meant to diagnose or offer medical advice.  Do not rely on the information provided as an alternative to medical advise from your doctor or other registered health care providers. If you have specific questions about any medical matter, please consult your physician or professional health care provider. All those with a chronic/acute injury or medical condition who wish to attend the ELDOA METHOD Classes must first receive clearance from their doctor or registered health professional prior to participation.

Here are some pictures from Dr. Mark and Jill’s seminar!  There might be videos to come but they couldn’t easily email those back to home base here in South Jersey!

Just like Pilates, we feel that the ELDOA Methods will greatly benefit our patients suffering with spine related issues and even more so with core stability and strength!  Both Pilates and ELDOA are very core-centric types of exercise for correcting and improving posture and the resting nature of the joints surrounding spine.  If you have questions about your issues or need to have questions answers, feel free to call us at 856-228-3100 or email us below!

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