Your Choice For Active Release, Sports Injury, and Chiropractic Care

Schedule an Appointment, Call : 856-228-3100

Locations : Laurel Springs, Haddonfield, Mt Laurel, Somers Point, and Washington Township, NJ

All Posts in Category: DR ANDREW GROSS DC

Lower Back Injury and what you can do!

Every year thousands of people suffer some type of lower back injury. This often requires a visit to their chiropractor as a result of gardening or doing some other type of yard work. This happens a lot in the spring when people are anxious to get outside and tend to their yards after months of being penned indoors by the winter season.

It is relatively easy to injure your back, especially if you are moving heavy objects around the yard. While good chiropractic care is always one of the first things you should do after receiving such an injury, you also want to consider the fact that chiropractic care, which occurs on a fairly regular basis, may help to curb some of these injuries in the first place as does following some common safety precautions when you are working in your yard. Our team can help you improve your readiness for the spring season using Active Release Technique, Chiropractic Manipulation, home exercise strategies, and improving your stretching at home as well!

There are a number of tips that can help you when it comes to preventing back injuries while you are working in your yard. Perhaps one of the most important things to remember is that in most cases, the more fit you are the less likely you are to suffer an injury of this type. Fitness is a good idea in any case and this is especially true when you are performing any type of rigorous physical activity. Good muscle tone and flexibility will go a long way toward helping you stay healthy and free from back injuries that can be very painful.

In addition, you always want to lift properly. Always lift with your knees and keep your feet in front of you approximately a shoulder length apart or even slightly wider. Whatever you do, always avoid lifting with your back. This is one of the primary reasons that people receive back injuries in the first place. Another thing you can do to reduce your chances of injuring your back is to use tools that work well for you. If you are an individual with a smaller build, you need to use smaller tools and try not to move things that are too heavy without help.

Of course, if you do feel tightness in your back, or you have had an especially hard day, you can typically relieve much of the tension by icing the muscles appropriately. If you prefer, you may want to alternate ice and heat in order to reduce inflammation and then relax the muscles. Ensure that you do not apply ice directly to the skin and that you use caution when applying heat as well.

It is always a good idea to visit your chiropractor on a regular basis even if you are not currently experiencing any problems. Professional golfers in particular have recently shown that they stay in top shape with semi regular visits to the chiropractor. This can prevent you from suffering a back injury or some other type of injury while you are working in your yard.

In the event that you do suffer an injury our team would be more than happy to help and can be an integral part of the recovery process. Working in your yard and getting ready for spring is something that most people enjoy, but it is also something that you should do carefully in order to ensure that you do not injure yourself. Be safe and contact us with any questions you may have.

If you have questions, please use our CONTACT US page at the following link!

https://drmarkkemenoshandassociates.com/contact/

Read More

Ice or Heat for Injuries – Is the medical standard changing

A very interesting article appeared over at Spartan.com posing the question “Is RICE all wrong?”, and jumps to the question of Ice or Heat for injuries and it caught the eye of Dr. Andrew Gross and Dr. Josh Sand at out office because when we were in Chiropractic around five years ago, the automatic correct test answer in a lot of cases for injuries was ICE, there were rumblings that possibly RICE was going to be changed to something different.

For the most part RICE isn’t totally wrong, we just don’t feel it is as correct as it once was for all major injuries. Simply put icing most injuries is not a bad idea and safe. The idea of RICE comes from Dr. Gabe Mirkin MD who published a book about sportsmedicine (The Sportsmedicine Book) and ever since then the standard has been RICE which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. For around forty years now, Dr. Mirkin has been thought of as the authority on immediately icing an injury (along with compression and elevation.

We thought for a long time that icing the injury stopped, or at least limited the flow of inflammation to the injured region but we now understand that it only delays the processes. The newest ideas that numbing the injury only dulls the pain and sometimes does not permit you to feel the warning signs of pain being caused by injured tissue. The article linked below showed that 22 seperate studies found that “ice is commonly used after acute muscle strains, but there are no clinical studies of its effectiveness.” A report in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research was even more alarming. Not only does icing fail to help injuries heal, the authors found, it may well delay recovery from injury. In 2017 The Journal of Athletic Medicine Research recently showed that icing actually kills muscle cells when they are iced for too long of a period post injury most likely from the direct effects of the inflammatory response of the injury being “held” directly on the injured tissue and not being pumped around due to the ice holding it there.

Taken directly from the article on Spartan.com —

“You might think that Dr. Mirkin would bristle at this blow to his erstwhile recommendations. Not so—he now openly rejects at least half of the RICE advice that helped make him famous. “I do not believe in cooling anymore,” he explained via email. Nor does he believe in the “R” component of his famous prescription either.
In a foreword to the second edition of Iced!, Dr. Mirkin says most athletes are far more concerned with long-term healing than transient pain relief. “And research,” he writes, “now shows that both ice and prolonged rest actually delay recovery.”

Check out the article for yourself at https://life.spartan.com/post/is-r-i-c-e-all-wrong

 

 

Read More

Adrenaline Run Post Race Party Recovery Room – Haddonfield Adrenaline 5k

The Haddonfield Adrenaline 5k almost  always signals that we are at least getting somewhat close to spring in South Jersey.Just like last year we had the honor of setting up in the basement of the Haddonfield Running Co after the Haddonfield Adrenaline Run 5k. Per the norm we had the Physical Therapy team from The Training Room of Cherry Hill and The Training Room of Haddonfield along with us and they even brought there newest form of therapy, a cold laser. Runners, runner injuries, runner issues, and triathletes make up a very big part of our patient population and while some doctors offices don’t enjoy runners, we look forward to the challenge of getting someone feeling better with a goal in mind like a big race or a triathlon.

You can see the from the photos that follow that we had a full docket of our runners, friends and family looking forward to some Active Release Therapy after the race.

Questions about the big race?

The 13th Annual Haddonfield Adrenaline 5K Run will be held Saturday, March 17, 2018.  The 5k starts at 9am in front of Haddonfield High School and is followed by a kids 1/4 mile and 100 meter races on the Haddonfield High School track. The 5K race is USATF certified, and serves as the MidAtlantic 5K Championship. This event is sponsored by the RunningCo. of Haddonfield. Kick off the 2018 running season with an adrenaline pumping race!

This race sells out year in and year out! If you want to joint us next year to get your adrenaline pumping for the spring running season, be ready to sign up in late winter!

https://runsignup.com/Race/NJ/Haddonfield/HaddonfieldAdrenaline5K

Read More

Resolving the causes and effects of back pain – Active Release – Dr Mark Kemenosh and Associates

Link to original content – http://activerelease.com/news.asp

Resolving the causes and effects of back pain – Active Release Technique – Dr Mark Kemenosh and Associates

One of the most common injuries that ART® providers treat, indiscriminate of their work setting, is lower back pain. Accordingly, it’s no surprise that lower back pain is the most commonly recorded musculoskeletal disorder. In the United States alone, it is the culprit of $100-200 billion in medical expenses each year. 80% of the U.S. population is affected by back pain at some time in their life. The high prevalence of back pain has enabled us at Active Release Techniques® to spend a lot of time studying the causes and most effective treatment protocols for each individual cause.

Back pain results from a wide array of working circumstances including heavy or repetitive lifting, over-reaching working in an awkward posture, and remaining bent over or seated for too long, just to name a few. These tasks create scar tissue, which causes pain, weakness, and reduced range of motion. Because of the large variety of behaviors causing back pain, cases of back-related MSDs can be found in nearly any workplace setting, from offices to factories. Whether the activity causing the pain is sitting, reaching, or lifting, pain origination is frequently linked to doing any of these activities with an awkward posture. Additionally, as people age, their incidence of back pain rises as does the cost, which increases at a greater rate due to the increased time, medication, and procedures necessary for their recovery.

Sitting puts twice as much stress on your back as standing, and when you slouch that stress is compounded. Further, sitting in a slouched position over-stretches the ligaments in your back. Not only do sitting and slouching add stress, they also prevent nutrients from getting to the discs in your spine. Excessive sitting can also cause pain in your hips and pelvis because it tightens and shortens the tendons in that region, placing even more pressure on the lower back. Pain resulting from maintaining an awkward posture, such as crouching or bending for an extended period of time, is often caused by some variation on this same reasoning.

Back pain as a result of heavy or repetitive lifting is also frequently a function of lifting with an awkward or incorrect posture. The weight being lifted adds additional stress to the spine, and awkward posture exacerbates the issue by causing muscles, tendons, or ligaments to over-stretch or tear.

So many of the things we do every day can build up scar tissue over time and cause back pain. Luckily, ART® can help, not only to relieve your pain and release your scar tissue, but also, through our onsite wellness programs, suggest things that you can do to prevent that scar tissue from building up in the first place.

Link to original content – http://activerelease.com/news.asp

Read More

Knee Pain – A common injury with many causes – Dr Mark Kemenosh and Associates

Link to original content – http://activerelease.com/news.asp

ART® has a long history working with athletes of all kinds, and was actually developed when the founder, Dr. P. Michael Leahy was working with elite athletes to help them get back to peak performance more quickly. No matter the kind of athletic endeavor in which you partake, knee injuries are a common frustration that can be resolved with ART® In addition to being extremely prevalent, knee injuries can also be some of the most nagging, because they can take a long time to come back from, and can stop people from working out or training for weeks or months.

The knee must support body weight as well as flex and extend to generate the propulsive forces needed to move the body. To help the knee serve its very important function, it is surrounded by a complex group of muscles that must be strong, flexible, and coordinated enough to protect and stabilize the knee.

Knee injuries are so common because the knee is interconnected with other joints, namely the hip and the ankle, as a part of the kinetic chain. The knee is a hinge joint that is designed to move backward and forward, but the other joints in the kinetic chain, the hip and ankle, move front to back, side to side, and around in circles. Understanding how pain in one joint can come from elsewhere in the kinetic chain is an important part of how ART® providers diagnose a soft-tissue injury. Very often, knee pain is symptomatic of issues in the adjacent muscles or joints. If the hip or foot has even a minor issue such as over-tightness, weakness, muscle imbalance, or faulty alignment, it can overload the bones and ligaments in the knee, and places even more demand on the muscles around the knee as they try to keep it from moving from side to side or twisting.

When there is a problem anywhere in this kinetic chain, the knee is often the first place to develop pain, even if it is not the source of the problem. This is referred to as movement compensation. The forces generated by any athletic activity do not get properly distributed and they become focused at the knee. For this reason, when diagnosing knee pain, ART® providers know that they must examine the entire kinetic chain, and not just the knee and its surrounding muscles. Treatment that focuses on just the knee often results in re-injury because the root of the problem is not addressed.

Traditional treatments for knee pain often involve some combination of heat, ice, ultrasound, muscle stimulation, steroid injections, exercises, and sometimes even surgery. Many of these methods are ways to temporarily relax the muscles, and all of them deal exclusively with the knee and the muscles surrounding it. These treatments often take a long time to see significant results, and even then those results are temporary and the injury usually recurs. This is because the root of the problem has not been addressed, the entire kinetic chain has not been examined, and scar tissue has not been released.

An ART® provider watches you move and examines the entire kinetic chain using tactile observation to feel the texture and tension of each muscle, and releases the scar tissue that sustains the injury with palpation. This assures that the root of the problem is addressed and keeps the injury from happening again. Best of all, ART® treatment delivers noticeable results in just one 15-minute treatment and can resolve the injury completely with just 5-10 treatments, so you can get back to your active lifestyle as quickly as possible.

Link to original content – http://activerelease.com/news.asp

Read More

Atrophy of gluteus maximus among women with a history of chronic low back pain

Saw a nice article recently post from our neighbors over at Department of Physical Therapy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2 School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 3 Department of Biomedical Education and Anatomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Article Title: Atrophy of gluteus maximus among women with a history of chronic low back pain

Methods:  For this case-control study, we analyzed medical history and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans for 36 female patients with a history of chronic LBP, and 32 female patients without a history of LBP. Muscle cross-sectional area of gluteus maximus was measured from axial CT scans using OsiriX MD software, then was normalized to patient height, and used to compare the two groups. The number of back pain-related medical visits was also correlated with gluteus maximus cross-sectional area.

Conclusions: This research demonstrated a previously only minimally explored relationship between gluteus maximus cross-sectional area and LBP in women. Further research is indicated in individuals with varying age, sex, and LBP diagnoses.

Direct Link: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0177008

Take away ideas from this study in a nut shell:  

This research confirmed Thomas Jefferson’s Physical Therapy Researchers hypothesis that Glute Max atrophy would be greater in individuals with chronic LBP. Further research is indicated on Glute Max CSA in individuals with varying age, sex, and LBP diagnoses. Research on the potential impact of exercise interventions targeting GM in individuals with chronic LBP is also indicated.

If you are struggling with low back pain, we can almost always help! We combine chiropractic, active release, home exercise programs and much more to the treatment of all types of back pain. Give us a call at 856.228.3100 for more information or send us an email a the link below!

Contact

Read More

The New York Times – Bring On the Exercise, Hold the Painkillers

Over the weekend a fantastic article that speaks to a team of chiropractors like we have at the office appeared on my social feeds! On The New York Times Running Newsletter the following article was published about exercise and why some forms of NSAID’s and Painkillers and endurance athletes like runners, swimmers, and cyclists should think first before just dismissing the issue and reaching for ibuprofen or naproxen in most cases.

Taken directly from the article by Gretchen Reynolds:

Taking ibuprofen and related over-the-counter painkillers could have unintended and worrisome consequences for people who vigorously exercise. These popular medicines, known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, work by suppressing inflammation. But according to two new studies, in the process they potentially may also overtax the kidneys during prolonged exercise and reduce muscles’ ability to recover afterward.

Direct Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/05/well/move/bring-on-the-exercise-hold-the-painkillers.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ru_20170707&nl=running&nl_art=1&nlid=80378830&ref=headline&te=1&_r=0

NSAID use is especially widespread among athletes in strenuous endurance sports like marathon and ultramarathon running. By some estimates, as many as 75 percent of long-distance runners take ibuprofen or other NSAIDs before, during or after training and races.

Being a marathoner myself I cannot refute the fact that on occasion I do take the label dosage of ibuprofen but understand that in most cases this is a poor choice for dealing with a running issue.  While most outsiders think of our office as “just another chiropractic office” we also offer Active Release Technique, commonly referred to as “ART” and in sports like running, cycling, and swimming, we usually offer a huge amount of upside with treatment to all sorts of issues commonly encountered.  I have even broken myself to some extent to not use ibuprofen (advil) or naproxen (aleve), which at times is tough with very small injuries that often times only slow me down, but do not keep me from running and going to the gym.

Some other valuable links about “pills” and runners / endurance athletes to check out are the following!

The Pill Problem – The right drug can relieve pain and discomfort—or put you in a world of hurt.

Direct Link: http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-treatment/what-runners-should-know-about-pain-medications

From the article written by Christie Ashwanden:

After winning a 24-hour track run in record time, Stephanie Ehret should have been celebrating. Instead, she was in a Phoenix emergency room, vomiting up a strange substance, which a doctor informed her was part of her digestive-tract lining. Feverish and nauseous, Ehret could barely move. “I’d never felt so bad,” she says. “I was pretty sure I was dying.”

A few hours later, doctors diagnosed the problem—rhabdomyolysis, a potentially fatal precursor to kidney failure. Though dehydration and overexertion contributed to Ehret’s condition, doctors told her that the 12 ibuprofen pills she’d taken during the 24-hour race had pushed her kidneys into the danger zone.

When used properly, over-the-counter pain medications can be a godsend. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can tame many pains. And non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen can reduce pain and swelling in the first few days following an acute injury like an ankle sprain. The trouble comes, doctors say, when people, like Ehret, misuse these drugs. “A couple of ibuprofens really helped, so I figured more was better,” Ehret says. Indeed, many runners treat anti-inflammatory drugs like “vitamin I,” says pharmacologist Joe Graedon, coauthor of The People’s Pharmacy book series. “They think, I’m putting my body through a lot, so I’ll just dose up on ibuprofen, without appreciating how potentially dangerous this drug can be.”

The Dangers Of Mixing Meds While Running

Direct Link:  https://houseofrunning.com/the-dangers-of-mixing-meds-and-running/

From the article written by Laurie Villarreal for House of Running –

I was at the start of the CPC half marathon last weekend when a runner said to me that she had just taken some ibuprofen for a headache. I immediately thought, “oh no, bad idea.” While ibuprofen might help with a headache or with post-race inflammation, it can be too risky to take before a running event. This is something that I never do. Before mixing medication with running, it’s quite important for you to know the risks as well.

Ibuprofen is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), which can be particularly risky for runners. NSAIDs also include the common drugs aspirin and naproxen, as well as many others. When taken before or during a run, it can cause harm to your kidneys, increase your blood pressure to risky levels, and put you at greater risk for hyponatremia. No matter the reason for taking an NSAID, it is not often worth the risk.

The best part about being a chiropractor who specializes in Active Release Technique here in South Jersey is that more than likely we can correct most running issues using hands on Myofascial Manipulation coupled with treatments like Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Manipulation and some NATURAL anti-inflammatories to keep you running, biking, swimming, cross fitting, ninjaing and more at a very high level!

Questions?  Give our front desk a call at 856-228-3100 or use the contact us link below!

Contact

Find Us On Facebook

Find Us On Facebook!

Read More

Science Says Running Helps You Live Longer – MapMyRun.com

Link to original study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28365296

Original Study Title: Running as a Key Lifestyle Medicine for Longevity.

Journal: Progressive Cardiovascular Disease

While the doctors here aren’t totally surprised to see an article like this one go online, we do like the idea that walking or running at a high level for around two hours of time weekly greatly help your heart stay in better shape which then adds years to your life!

From the Article written by Lara Rosenbaum:

The benefits of running are countless. Easy and obvious ones are improved cardiovascular health — including lower levels of cholesterol, better moods and increased bone density. And now there’s another major plus to regularly lacing up your sneakers and racking up some miles: a longer life.

THE LATEST STUDY

If you already love running, here’s another reason to dig it: A new study published in Progress in Cardiovascular Disease, revealed that running may add about three years to your life, and reduce the risk of early mortality by up to 40%. “Running decreases many risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and it strengthens the heart more so than other forms of exercise given its ability to drive the heart rate up and keep it sustained at a high rate,” explains exercise physiologist and running coach, Jason Karp, PhD, author of “The Inner Runner.” “Running also increases aerobic power (VO2 max) more than other forms of cardio — and VO2 max is the single biggest indicator of a person’s aerobic fitness.”

Link to original article: http://blog.mapmyrun.com/science-says-running-helps-live-longer/?utm_source=mfp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=workouts20170603

Looking for our previous articles on running?  Please see below.

Running actually lowers inflammation in knee joints – Running may also slow the process that leads to osteoarthritis

Dr Craig’s favorite prehabilitation exercise – Monster Walk with Theraband

 

The Running Works Day Of Distance Wrap Up – Villanova University

Read More

Achy Joints – More EVIDENCE that HIGH QUALITY Chondroitin Sulfate supplementation helps arthritis.

Direct Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28533290

While looking for pertinent and relative research to issues we deal with here at the office, I came across this article online which was very recently published in supplementation research.  PubMed is your basic search site for indexing research studies and usually one of the first places we look as doctors trying to stay ahead on the evidence based practice spectrum of chiropractic.

For about 15-20 years, Chriopractors, Nutritionists, and some other medical professionals have felt confident that Chondroitin and Glucosamine supplements from GOOD SOURCES help to keep arthritic joints moving freely.  Please note that we stress good sources with all supplements.  We don’t mind if you buy your supplements from other sources than our office, just be sure the source is reputable!

The best part of this study is this, the conclusion in a study basically tells you what the researchers what you want to know and this one goes right to the point in dealing with osteoarthritis, pain, and tightness in the joints.

CONCLUSION:  A 800 mg/day pharmaceutical-grade CS is superior to placebo and similar to celecoxib in reducing pain and improving function over 6 months in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This formulation of CS should be considered a first-line treatment in the medical management of knee OA.

Here at the office we of both a basic Chondroitin and Glucosamine from Anabolic Labratories, but also an even better version known as Nutra-Disc which contains several different natural anti-inflammatories like Turmeric, Bromelain, Curcumin and many others. Nutra Disc is a unique proprietary product for disc injuries and related connective tissue problems.  Nutra Disc contains a specialized blend of ingredients designed to support the body’s natural response to maintain good joint health, promote the production of collagen, and support the rebuilding of cartilage.

We previously published positive quality research about Chondroitin and Glucoasamine supplementation on our blog a few months back which you can see at the link below.

Link: https://drmarkkemenoshandassociates.com/positive-studies-chondroitin-glucosamine-osteoarthritis-continue-grow/

Direct link to the Nutra-Disc label: http://www.anaboliclabs.com/User/Document/Labels/Nutra%20Disc%203629-180C%203.0×9%20optimized.pdf

Direct link to the Nutra-Disc data sheet: http://www.anaboliclabs.com/User/Document/Fact_Sheets/NutraDisc_DataSheet.pdf

Read More

The ELDOA Method has hit the Jersey Shore, coming soon to Haddonfield and Mount Laurel!

This past weekend, Jill Kemenosh, Dr. Mark Kemenosh, and CK Pilates hosted an introduction to The ELDOA Method to help combat typical areas of pain and tenderness with a new type of deep myofascial stretching.  ELDOA, which translates to LOADS (longitudinal osteoarticular decoaptation system) was developed by world renowned Osteopath, Guy Voyer, initially to provide rehabilitation for people suffering from scoliosis. Each posture was developed with surgeon-like precision, working on decompressing individual spinal segments. This precision bring an added diagnostic benefit to the training: it exposes specific weaknesses and give the practitioner the information needed to tackle their individual issues even after one class.  The most commonly treated issues with ELDOA are low back pain and neck pain.

The intro class was structured to include ELDOA for each segment of the spine – lumbar, thoracic, cervical – and the exercises are beneficial to anyone and everyone taking the class. This training alone was successful in slowing down and even reversing the effects of scoliosis. It is now used by a variety of people (professional athletes, children, seniors, exercise enthusiasts) for countless benefits including; pain relief, postural alignment and awareness, spinal decompression, better neurological and endocrine function and full body fitness.

Here are some photos of the event hosted at CK Pilates in Marmora, NJ!  (Click on them for the full view)

CK Pilates Website

     

The next events will hopefully be hosted at Haddonfield Fitness in Haddonfield, New Jersey as well as our new location opening this summer in Mount Laurel, New Jersey!

Haddonfield Fitness Website

Jill Kemenosh can be reached at her website – http://www.frameworkbodies.com/

Read More